5 February 2015

A solution to stretch marks that form during pregnancy is now available for purchase online. The unique three-part bump support system comprises of a support band, and a day and night cream.

Developed by Professor Robert Brown of The UCL Institute of Orthopaedics & Musculoskeletal Sciences (IOMS) together with Dr Steve Barker at University College London Hospitals, the band is clinically proven to prevent stretch marks in two thirds of pregnant women.

Stretch marks are left by a tearing below the surface of the skin (dermis), often caused by the stresses and strains of a developing pregnancy.  The bands works by gripping and supporting the skin evenly, equalising the stress points forming underneath and providing under bump and lower back support.

Worn around the stomach, the band comprises of a pattern of pads which provide a protective barrier by spreading the strains and stresses on the skin keeping skin damage to a minimum and preventing skin tears from turning into full blown stretch marks.

In collaboration with commercial partners, UCLB filed a patent claiming the use of the pregnancy band for preventing and reducing stretch marks in pregnant women.  Working closely with the inventors, UCLB has taken this system to market, recently licensing the patent rights to Secret Saviours Ltd.

Derek Reay, Senior Business Manager at UCLB commented, “The clinical trial clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the pregnancy band for preventing stretch marks, and consequently we anticipate a successful launch of this innovative product.

Links:
The Secret Saviours Bump Support Pack is priced at £69.95 and is available to buy online via secretsaviours.com

As featured in the Daily Mail
Breakthrough in battle against stretch marks as £70 band that stops the unsightly condition developing goes on sale in UK
It’s NOT just having babies — hormones and growth spurts can cause stretchmarks and their psychological impact can be devastating…Can anything cure the curse?

About UCL Business PLC
UCL Business PLC (UCLB) is a leading technology transfer company that supports and commercialises research and innovations arising from UCL, one of the UK’s top research-led universities. UCLB has a successful track record and a strong reputation for identifying and protecting promising new technologies and innovations from UCL academics. UCLB has a strong track record in commercialising medical technologies and provides technology transfer services to UCL’s associated hospitals; University College London Hospitals, Moorfields Eye Hospital, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and the Royal Free London Hospital. It invests directly in development projects to maximise the potential of the research and manages the commercialisation process of technologies from laboratory to market.

For further information, please visit: www.uclb.com

About Secret Saviours
Secret Saviours are a small team of mums and medical specialists who are passionate about helping women prevent stretch marks.
We are completely honest about our products and how they work.
We like results and we do everything we can to show you that our promises can be achieved.
Secret Saviours like proof, using evidence from clinical and scientific experts.
We are the only prevention system that has been clinically proven to reduce your chance of stretch marks appearing by more than 70%.
We also like good quality materials. That’s why we ensured that the Support Band was comfortable and supportive. We spent time making sure the fragrance was heavenly and the texture of the Day Gel and the Night Cream were just right.
In addition to our clinical trial, we’ve been sending Secret Saviours to pregnant ladies across the globe to trial over the last six months.
They have given us invaluable feedback on the quality of the product and crucially, if it’s working.
The results have been amazing.
Out of the 65 ladies who have been using the product, only one has had a small stretch mark.
We’d like to think that Secret Saviours will give you the best possible insurance to save your skin from stretch marks and doctors, scientists and our trial ladies agree.